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  • Teeth serve as 'archive of life,' new research finds

    Teeth constitute a permanent and faithful biological archive of the entirety of the individual's life, from tooth formation to death, a team of researchers has found. Its work provides new evidence of the impact that events, such as reproduction and imprisonment, have on an organism.

  • Commonly used mouthwash could make saliva significantly more acidic, change microbes

    The first study looking at the effect of chlorhexidine mouthwash on the entire oral microbiome has found its use significantly increases the abundance of lactate-producing bacteria that lower saliva pH, and may increase the risk of tooth damage. "In the face of the recent COVID-19 outbreak many dentists are now using chlorhexidine as a pre-rinse before doing dental procedures. We urgently need more information on how it works on viruses," said one of the researchers.

  • Stem cells and nerves interact in tissue regeneration and cancer progression

    Researchers show that different stem cell populations are innervated in distinct ways. Innervation may therefore be crucial for proper tissue regeneration. They also demonstrate that cancer stem cells likewise establish contacts with nerves. Targeting tumor innervation could thus lead to new cancer therapies.

  • Ouch: Patients prescribed opioids after tooth extraction report worse pain

    The use of opioids to soothe the pain of a pulled tooth could be drastically reduced or eliminated altogether from dentistry, say researchers.

  • Researchers discover tooth-enamel protein in eyes with dry AMD

    A protein that normally deposits mineralized calcium in tooth enamel may also be responsible for calcium deposits in the back of the eye in people with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to a new study.

  • Not only what you eat, but how you eat, may affect your microbiome

    Researchers found that post-stroke patients re-grow a healthy microbiota in their mouth and gut when they revert to normal food intake from tube feeding. These results emphasize the need to actively normalize feeding in these patients, not only to minimize the risks of tube feeding, but also because oral feeding significantly alters the microbiome of both the mouth and the gut, potentially with beneficial consequences for overall health.

  • The microbes in your mouth, and a reminder to floss and go to the dentist

    Most people know that good oral hygiene -- brushing, flossing, and regular dental visits -- is linked to good health. Microbiome researchers offer fresh evidence to support that conventional wisdom, by taking a close look at invisible communities of microbes that live in every mouth. Their study found a correlation between people who did not visit the dentist regularly and increased presence of a pathogen that causes periodontal disease.

  • Could this plaque identifying toothpaste prevent a heart attack or stroke?

    For decades, researchers have suggested a link between oral health and inflammatory diseases affecting the entire body -- in particular, heart attacks and strokes. Results of a randomized pilot trial of Plaque HD®, the first toothpaste that identifies plaque so that it can be removed with directed brushing, showed that it produced a statistically significant reduction in C-reactive protein, a sensitive marker for future risks of heart attacks and strokes, among those with elevations at baseline.

  • How too much fluoride causes defects in tooth enamel

    Exposing teeth to excessive fluoride alters calcium signaling, mitochondrial function, and gene expression in the cells forming tooth enamel -- a novel explanation for how dental fluorosis, a condition caused by overexposure to fluoride during childhood, arises.

  • Chemical found in drinking water linked to tooth decay in children

    Children with higher concentrations of a certain chemical in their blood are more likely to get cavities, according to a new study. Researchers found that higher concentrations of PFAS were associated with greater tooth decay in children.

  • Why eating yogurt may help lessen the risk of breast cancer

    One of the causes of breast cancer may be inflammation triggered by harmful bacteria suggest researchers. Scientists advise consuming natural yogurt, which contains beneficial bacteria which dampens inflammation and which is similar to the bacteria found in breastfeeding mothers. Their suggestion is that this bacteria is protective because breast feeding reduces the risk of breast cancer. The consumption of yogurt is also associated with a reduction in the risk of breast cancer.

  • Preventing, healing tooth decay with a bioactive peptide

    Cavities, or dental caries, are the most widespread non-communicable disease globally, according to the World Health Organization. Having a cavity drilled and filled at the dentist's office can be painful, but untreated caries could lead to worse pain, tooth loss, infection, and even illness or death. Now, researchers report a bioactive peptide that coats tooth surfaces, helping prevent new cavities and heal existing ones in lab experiments.

  • Ancient 'chewing gum' yields insights into people and bacteria of the past

    Researchers have succeeded in extracting a complete human genome from a thousands-of-years old 'chewing gum.' According to the researchers, it is a new untapped source of ancient DNA.

  • Link between obesity and gum disease

    Obesity and gum (periodontal) disease are among the most common non-communicable diseases in the United States -- and studies show these chronic conditions may be related. This new study explores the effect of obesity on non-surgical periodontal care and evaluates potential pathways that may illustrate the connection between the two conditions.

  • Brush your teeth to protect the heart

    Brushing teeth frequently is linked with lower risks of atrial fibrillation and heart failure, according to a new study.

  • Experts call for more active prevention of tooth decay for children's teeth

    Three-year trial comparing three treatment strategies for tooth decay in children's teeth finds no evidence to suggest that conventional fillings are more successful than sealing decay into teeth, or using preventive methods alone. 43% of those participating in the study experienced toothache or dental infection regardless of the treatment received.

  • First adult molars are 'living fossils' that hold a 'health record' dating back to the womb

    Researchers have found that a person's first permanent molars carry a life-long record of health information dating back to the womb, storing vital information that can connect maternal health to a child's health, even hundreds of years later.

  • Milk from teeth: Dental stem cells can generate milk-producing cells

    Stem cells of the teeth can contribute to the regeneration of non-dental organs, namely mammary glands. According to a new study, dental epithelial stem cells from mice can generate mammary ducts and even milk-producing cells when transplanted into mammary glands. This could be used for post-surgery tissue regeneration in breast cancer patients.

  • Soft drinks found to be the crucial link between obesity and tooth wear

    A new study has found that sugar-sweetened acidic drinks, such as soft drinks, is the common factor between obesity and tooth wear among adults.

  • A 'shocking' new way to treat infections

    New research introduces a revolutionary treatment for these infections. The group is utilizing electrochemical therapy (ECT) to enhance the ability of antibiotics to eradicate the microbes.

  • A secret in saliva: Food and germs helped humans evolve into unique member of great apes

    Researchers discovered that the human diet -- a result of increased meat consumption, cooking and agriculture -- has led to stark differences in the saliva of humans compared to that of other primates.

  • Special sensory cells in gums protect against periodontitis

    Newly discovered chemical-sensing cells in the gums protect the mouth by standing guard against infections that damage soft tissue and destroy the bone that supports the teeth. With the help of bitter taste receptors that also detect byproducts from harmful bacteria, these special gum cells trigger the immune system to control the amount and type of bacteria in the mouth and could one day lead to personalized dental treatments against gum disease.

  • Tooth loss associated with higher risk of heart disease

    Adults who have lost teeth due to nontraumatic reasons may have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

  • As we age, oral health plays increasing role in overall health

    Oral health is a critical component to overall health for all ages, but according to dental and medical experts, vigilance is especially critical for the elderly.

  • Gum disease linked with higher risk of hypertension

    People with gum disease (periodontitis) have a greater likelihood of high blood pressure (hypertension), according to a new study.

  • An oral splint that can reduce Tourette syndrome tics

    Researchers developed a new device that ameliorates the characteristic vocal and motor tics of Tourette syndrome. By biting down on the simple, removable oral splint, both adults and children with Tourette syndrome experienced a reduction in their tics. The action of biting down on the oral splint could serve as a sensory trick; sensory tricks are known to ameliorate motor symptoms in cervical dystonia. The device might be particularly effective in children.

  • Acute periodontal disease bacteria love colon and dirt microbes

    Mythbuster: The idea that bacterial collaborations within microbiomes, like in the mouth, have evolved to be generous and exclusive very much appears to be wrong. In an extensive experiment, lavish collaborations ensued between random microbes. And some bacteria from the same microbiome were stingy with one another.

  • Poor oral health linked to cognitive decline, perceived stress

    Two studies explore the relationship between poor oral health and cognitive decline and the effects of perceived stress and social support on dry mouth among older Chinese Americans.

  • Scientists uncover key new molecules that could help to tackle tooth loss and regeneration

    New research published in the Journal of Dental Research has shed light on the science behind the formation of the periodontal ligament, which helps keep the tooth stable in the jawbone. This improved understanding will help scientists work towards regenerating the tissues that support teeth. This is a peer-reviewed, observational study conducted in rodent teeth and human cells.

  • First human ancestors breastfed for longer than contemporary relatives

    By analyzing the fossilized teeth of some of our most ancient ancestors, scientists have discovered that the first humans significantly breastfed their infants for longer periods than their contemporary relatives.

  • Elite athletes have poor oral health despite brushing twice daily

    Elite athletes have high rates of oral disease despite brushing their teeth more frequently than most people, finds a new study.

  • A new method of tooth repair? Scientists uncover mechanisms to inform future treatment

    Stem cells hold the key to wound healing, as they develop into specialized cell types throughout the body -- including in teeth. Now an international team of researchers has found a mechanism that could offer a potential novel solution to tooth repair.

  • Fluoride may diminish kidney and liver function in adolescents

    Fluoride exposure may lead to a reduction in kidney and liver function among adolescents, according to a new study.

  • Visits to the dentist decline in old age, especially among minorities

    Visits to the dentist drop significantly after adults turn 80, finds a new study.

  • Maternal secrets of our earliest ancestors unlocked

    New research brings to light for the first time the evolution of maternal roles and parenting responsibilities in one of our oldest evolutionary ancestors. Australopithecus africanus mothers breastfed their infants for the first 12 months after birth, and continued to supplement their diets with breastmilk during periods of food shortage. Tooth chemistry analyses enable scientists to 'read' more than two-million-year-old teeth. Finding demonstrates why early human ancestors had fewer offspring and extended parenting role.

  • Dentistry: Root canal work not so bad after all

    Root canal work is not as bad as people think when compared to other dental procedures. Self-reporting of their dental health suggests that patients find the procedure no worse than other dental work which overturns the popular belief that root canal work is the most unpleasant dental treatment.

  • New antibacterial fillings may combat recurring tooth decay

    A new study finds potent antibacterial capabilities in novel dental restoratives, or filling materials.

  • Are you sure it's burning mouth syndrome?

    Not all burning mouths are the result of a medical condition known as 'burning mouth syndrome' (BMS) and physicians and researchers need better standards for an appropriate diagnosis, according to new research.

  • Poor oral health linked to a 75% increase in liver cancer risk

    Poor oral health is associated with a 75% increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer, new research has found.

  • Undetected diabetes linked to heart attack and gum disease

    People with undetected glucose disorders run a higher risk of both myocardial infarction and periodontitis, according to a new study. The results demonstrate the need of greater collaboration between dentistry and healthcare, say the researchers, and possibly of screening for diabetes at dental clinics.

  • Brush your teeth -- postpone Alzheimer's

    Researchers in Norway have discovered a clear connection between oral health and Alzheimer's disease.

  • Antibiotics that dentists prescribe are unnecessary 81% of the time

    Antibiotics prescribed by dentists as a preemptive strike against infection are unnecessary 81% of the time.

  • Presence of oral bacteria in cerebral emboli of stroke patients

    Researchers have shown for the first time that the cerebral emboli of stroke patients contain DNA from oral pathogens.

  • The healing power of a smile: A link between oral care and substance abuse recovery

    A new study links the benefits of comprehensive oral care to the physical and emotional recovery of patients seeking treatment for substance use disorder.

  • Protect protruding teeth from damage and long-term consequences

    Children with their first or early adult set of teeth that stick out have an increased chance of damaging them, but the risk can be easily reduced without being prohibitively costly.

  • Surface protein editing in bacteria

    New research delves into an unknown cell circuit in bacteria that can lead to new targets for antibiotics.

  • Your genetic make-up has little impact on your dental health, new study finds

    A new study estimates that one in three Australian children have tooth decay by the time they start school.

  • Common oral infections in childhood may increase the risk of atherosclerosis in adulthood

    A Finnish 27-year follow-up study suggests that common oral infections in childhood, caries and periodontal diseases, are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis in adulthood.

  • Dentists can be the first line of defense against domestic violence

    New findings indicate that oral biomarkers may help health providers identify victims of domestic violence.

  • An army of micro-robots can wipe out dental plaque

    A swarm of micro-robots, directed by magnets, can break apart and remove dental biofilm, or plaque, from a tooth. The innovation arose from a cross-disciplinary partnership among dentists, biologists, and engineers.

  • Sleep Apnea: Oral appliance could help you (and your partner) sleep better

    Researchers measured a novel treatment for sleep apnea and found positive results. By measuring patients lying down flat, the researchers stimulated sleep conditions and measured the patient's airways using 3D imaging. The study confirmed that the treatment is effective at opening the airways and warrants further collaboration between dentists and doctors in treatment of sleep apnea.

  • The history of humanity in your face

    The face you see in the mirror is the result of millions of years of evolution and reflects the most distinctive features that we use to identify and recognize each other, molded by our need to eat, breath, see, and communicate.

  • Teeth whitening products can harm protein-rich tooth layer

    Americans spend more than a billion dollars on teeth whitening products each year. Although these products can make smiles brighter, new research shows that they might also be causing tooth damage.

  • Gum bacteria implicated in Alzheimer's and other diseases

    Researchers are reporting new findings on how bacteria involved in gum disease can travel throughout the body, exuding toxins connected with Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis and aspiration pneumonia. They detected evidence of the bacteria in brain samples from people with Alzheimer's and used mice to show that the bacterium can find its way from the mouth to the brain.

  • Anti-inflammatory plant-based diet helps reduce gingivitis

    A plant-based whole food diet reduced gingivitis in a recent randomized trial.

  • New technique could help regrow tissue lost to periodontal disease

    About half of all Americans will have periodontal disease at some point in their lives. Characterized by inflamed gums and bone loss around teeth, the condition can cause bad breath, toothache, tender gums and, in severe cases, tooth loss. Now, researchers report development of a membrane that helps periodontal tissue regenerate when implanted into the gums of rats.

  • Oral bacteria in pancreas linked to more aggressive tumors

    The presence of oral bacteria in so-called cystic pancreatic tumours is associated with the severity of the tumour, researchers report. It is hoped that the results can help to improve diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  • Dental fillings could last twice as long

    A compound used to make car bumpers strong and protect wood decks could prevent return visits to the dentist's office. A team of researchers has created a filling material that's two times more resistant to breakage than standard fillings. The team also has developed an adhesive that's 30 percent stronger after six months in use than adhesives that are currently used to keep fillings in place.

  • How a common oral bacteria makes colon cancer more deadly

    Researchers have determined how a type of bacteria commonly found in the mouth accelerates the growth of colon cancer.

  • Activating tooth regeneration in mice

    Most reptiles and fish have multiple sets of teeth during their lifetime. However, most mammals, such as humans, have only one set of replacement teeth and some mammals, like mice, have only a single set with no replacement. This diversity raises both evolutionary questions -- how did different tooth replacement strategies evolve? -- and developmental ones -- which mechanisms prevent replacement teeth in animals that lost them?

  • Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) describes a variety of conditions that affect jaw muscles, temporomandibular joints and nerves associated with chronic facial pain. Symptoms may occur on one or both sides of the face, head or jaw, or develop after an injury. TMD affects more than twice as many women than men.    Updated: November 2008   

  • What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Filling)?

    What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Fillings)?   Most people recognize dental amalgams as silver fillings. Dental amalgam is a mixture of mercury, silver, tin and copper. Mercury, which makes up about 50 percent of the compound, is used to bind the metals together and to provide a strong, hard, durable filling. After years of research, mercury has been found to be the only eleme...

  • What is Orofacial Pain?

    Orofacial pain includes a number of clinical problems involving the chewing (masticatory) muscles or temporomandibular joint. Problems can include temporomandibular joint discomfort; muscle spasms in the head, neck and jaw; migraines, cluster or frequent headaches; or pain with the teeth, face or jaw.   You swallow approximately 2,000 times per day, which causes the upper and lower teeth t...

  • What is a Composite Resin (White Filling)?

    What is a Composite Resin (White Filling)?   A composite filling is a tooth-colored plastic and glass mixture used to restore decayed teeth. Composites are also used for cosmetic improvements of the smile by changing the color of the teeth or reshaping disfigured teeth.   How is a composite placed?   Following preparation, the dentist ...

  • Are You Biting Off More Than You Can Chew?

    In our fast-paced lives, many of us may be eating in a hurry, taking giant bites of our food to get done quickly and on to the next task. Fast-food restaurants advertise giant burgers and sandwiches as a selling point, but often those super-sized delicacies are larger than a human mouth.   Taking bites that are too big to chew could be bad for your jaw and teeth, says the Academy of Genera...

  • The History of Dental Advances

    The History of Dental Advances   Many of the most common dental tools were used as early as the Stone Age. Thankfully, technology and continuing education have made going to the dentist a much more pleasant – and painless – experience. Here is a look at the history of dentistry's most common tools, and how they came to be vital components of our oral health care needs.   Where did t...

  • Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction

    Dry socket, the most common postoperative complication from tooth extractions, delays the normal healing process and results when the newly formed blood clot in the extraction site does not form correctly or is prematurely lost. This blood clot lays the foundation for new tissue and bone to develop over a two-month healing process.   Updated: October 2008    

  • Headaches and Jaw Pain? Check Your Posture!

    If you experience frequent headaches and pain in your lower jaw, check your posture and consult your dentist about temporomandibular disorder (TMD), recommends the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), an organization of general dentists dedicated to continuing dental education.   Poor posture places the spine in a position that causes stress to the jaw joint. When people slouch or hunch over...

  • Men: Looking for a Better Job? Start by Visiting the Dentist

    Men: Looking for a Better Job? Start by Visiting the Dentist   An online poll of 289 general dentists and consumers confirms the traditional stereotype that men are less likely to visit the dentist than their female counterparts, according to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), an organization of general dentists dedicated to continuing dental education.   Why? Nearly 45 percent...

  • Why is Oral Health Important for Men?

    Why is Oral Health Important for Men?   Men are less likely than women to take care of their physical health and, according to surveys and studies, their oral health is equally ignored. Good oral health recently has been linked with longevity. Yet, one of the most common factors associated with infrequent dental checkups is just being male. Men are less likely than women to seek preventive ...

  • What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?

    What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?   Baby bottle tooth decay is caused by the frequent and long-term exposure of a child's teeth to liquids containing sugars. Among these liquids are milk, formula, fruit juice, sodas and other sweetened drinks. The sugars in these liquids pool around the infant's teeth and gums, feeding the bacteria in plaque. Every time a child consumes a sugary liquid, acid...

  • Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects

    Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects   It’s one of the hardest habits to break and can require a great deal of persuasion: Parents often struggle with weaning their child off of a pacifier.   There is much debate regarding the use of pacifiers, but there is evidence to show that there are both pros and cons, according to a study in the January/February 2007 issue of Gene...

  • Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay?

    Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay?   The average healthy adult visits the dentist twice a year. The average healthy 2-year-old has never been to the dentist. By kindergarten, 25 percent of children have never seen a dentist, yet dental decay is the single most common chronic childhood disease in America.   The culprit? A combination of misinformation about when a c...

  • When Should My Child First See a Dentist?

    When Should My Child First See a Dentist?   Your child's first visit to the dentist should happen before his or her first birthday. The general rule is six months after eruption of the first tooth. Taking your child to the dentist at a young age is the best way to prevent problems such as tooth decay, and can help parents learn how to clean their child's teeth and identify his or her fluori...

  • How Do I Care for My Child's Baby Teeth?

    How Do I Care for My Child’s Baby Teeth?   Though you lose them early in life, your primary teeth, also called baby teeth, are essential in the development and placement of your permanent teeth. Primary teeth maintain the spaces where permanent teeth will erupt and help develop proper speech patterns that would otherwise be difficult; without maintenance of these spaces, crowding and misali...

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